FAQ

What is a CASA volunteer?

What is the CASA volunteer’s role?

How does a CASA volunteer investigate a case?

How does the role of a CASA volunteer differ from an attorney?

Is there a “typical” CASA volunteer?

How many cases on average does a CASA volunteer carry at a time?

How effective have CASA programs been?

How much time does it require?

How do I become a volunteer?

What sort of background do I need?


What is a CASA volunteer?

A Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteer is a trained community member who is appointed by a judge to advocate for the best interests of abused and neglected children in court.

What is the CASA volunteer’s role?

A CASA volunteer provides a judge with carefully researched background information on a child to help the Court make a sound decision about the child’s future. The CASA volunteer must determine if it is in a child’s best interest to stay with his or her parents or guardians, be placed in foster care, be placed with relatives, or be freed for permanent adoption.

How does a CASA volunteer investigate a case?

To prepare a recommendation, the CASA volunteer talks with the child, parents, family members, social workers, school officials, health care providers and others who are knowledgeable about the child’s history. The CASA volunteer also reviews all records pertaining to the child—school, medical case worker reports, and other documents.

How does the role of a CASA volunteer differ from an attorney?

The CASA volunteer does not provide legal representation; however, CASA volunteers do provide crucial background information that assists the attorneys in presenting the child’s case.

Is there a “typical” CASA volunteer?

CASA volunteers come from all walks of life, with a variety of educational and ethnic backgrounds. Aside from their CASA volunteer responsibilities, most are employed.

How many cases on average does a CASA volunteer carry at a time?

Most CASA volunteers are assigned to one child or sibling group at a time allowing for individualized attention during the investigative process.

How effective have CASA programs been?

Research suggests that children who have been assigned CASA volunteers are less likely to remain in long-term foster care. Children assigned a CASA volunteer are more likely to be provided needed services such as therapy, healthcare, and educational support.

How much time does it require?

Every case is different, but volunteers spend an average of 10-15 hours per month advocating for their assigned CASA child/children.

How do I become a volunteer?

Contact your area CASA chapter to become a volunteer.

What sort of background do I need?

You don’t have to be a legal professional or social worker to be a CASA volunteer. We’ll train you in all necessary courtroom procedures and child advocacy techniques.





























>